Dear Health IT Folks, Please Submit a Proposal to The BPM and Case Management Summit!

Every year more ideas and technology from the business process management and case management software industry show up in the health IT industry. (BTW “case management” has a different, though related, meaning in the workflow industry than the healthcare industry.) For example, I see more-and-more BPM/case management IT vendors and professionals show up at the annual HIMSS health IT conference (see my HIMSS14 and Workflow: Are We Making Progress Taking Business Processes Out Of Applications?).

bpm-summit2

At the same time, knowledge about healthcare workflows and unique workflow technology requirements must flow in the reverse direction, back into the BPM and case management industry. The very best way to transport knowledge is in a human brain.

So, I encourage all health IT workflowistas to submit proposals (250-word abstract by Feb 28th) to the upcoming BPM and Case Management Summit here in Washington DC. Last year I encouraged health IT folks to attend, presented myself, and we had a great reception from the workflow folks. Here’s a link to my trip report from last year, including my presentation archived as a Youtube video: BPM and Case Management: US Healthcare Wants You, But May Not Know It, Yet!

Here is this year’s call for proposals (just 250 words!):

(BTW, ignore, for the moment, any buzzwords that may appear unfamiliar. The workflow tech industry and health IT often have different terminology for similar topics. You could very well be engaged in a BPM/case management initiative, but simply call it something different!]

Who Should Submit?

Program Leaders Involved With BPM, Case Management, Analytics, Architecture or Similar Initiatives

Practitioners and Consultants Experienced With Designing and Delivering Adaptable and Innovative Solutions Demonstrating Superior User Experience

Subject Matter Experts Engaged in Dynamic Business Processes and Data-driven Knowledge Work

Researchers and Educators Involved With Business Process Issues, Architecture and Modeling, Collaboration and Knowledge Worker Effectiveness, Standards Development, Information Interoperability or Related Fields

Why Should I Submit?

Submitting a proposal is quick, easy and risk-free. We will provide feedback to help refine your submission, and if selected you will:

Gain Visibility at the Industry’s Most Prestigious Forum, Plus the Opportunity to Network With Peers

Advance Understanding of Your Work and Achievements

Have the Opportunity to Published to BPM.com With Visibility to an Audience of 10,000s Per Month

Be Considered for Inclusion in a Forthcoming Book

The topics below frame the topics covered during the event, however, you are welcome to submit a proposal on any subject you believe is relevant.

Case Management

Investigative Case Management approaches and applications

Definition of Adaptive Case Management (ACM) as its own discipline (apart from BPM)

Data-centricity (state transitions and data interchange focus) of case management activities

Impact of Case Management Modeling Notation (CMMN) on practitioners and tool vendors

Case management in targeted vertical markets (notably Financial Services, Insurance, Health Care, as well as Federal, State and Municipal Government)
Services integration in case management applications

Business Process Management (BPM)

Definition of business process management (BPM) as its own discipline (apart from ACM)

Impact of Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN) on practitioners and tool vendors

Process analysis and re-engineering using simulation, mining, and monitoring key performance indicators

Business process as-is anti-patterns and to-be redesign patterns (best practices)

Distributed, end-to-end, and cross-organizational business processes

Cloud impact on BPM and executing business processes in the cloud

Enabling data-driven business processes

Business Analytics

Impact of “big data” and attendant issues on business analytics

Survey of technologies for performing process monitoring and other business analytics

Promise of semantic technologies for bridging big data divides across authoritative data sources

Process mining and its application in business analytics

Modeling and predictive analytics for enterprise computing

Collaboration enterprise analytic platforms

Business process intelligence (e.g., process performance management)

Continuous, online analytics for big data in the enterprise

Business Rules

Business rule languages and engines

Managing granularity of business rules from the line-of-business (LOB) to the enterprise

Rules interchange and interoperability across heterogeneous execution platforms

Modeling business rules and the relation between business rules and business processes

Business rules and service computing

Business rules and compliance management, business process compliance

Event-Driven Rules-based Business Processes for the Real-Time Enterprise

Process and Data Governance

Role of process classification frameworks and other normative architectures

Demonstrating compliance and establishing provenance of submitted models

Service policies, contract definition and enforcement

Security/privacy policy definition and description languages

Policy interoperability

Information Interoperability

Making data interchange work across BPM and ACM a reality

Business object modeling methodologies and approaches

Taxonomies, ontologies and business knowledge integration

Master data management, data mining and (real-time) data warehousing

Flexible information models and systems (e.g., object-driven processes)

Data quality and trustworthiness

The role of NIEM and standard data descriptions to achieve interoperability

Evolution of SOA and API management to support mobile computing

A uniform resource identifier (URI) for everything the worker needs

Business Architecture Modeled Across the Enterprise

Enterprise architecture frameworks vs. business architecture frameworks

Design and population of architecture models – state of the market and practices today

Relationship of architectures to BPM and ADM disciplines

Enterprise or business architecture analysis, assessment and prediction

Cloud computing and the evolution of architectures

Enterprise ontologies and common vocabularies

Posted in healthcare-BPM | Leave a comment

Who Will Be On The HIMSS15 Top Ten List Of Healthcare Workflow Movers & Shakers?

pow-hit520b

During the upcoming HIMSS15 conference, April 12-16, in Chicago, at the peak of #HIMSSanity I’ll publish and tweet, one at a time, the HIMSS15 Top Ten List of People and Organizations improving Healthcare with Health Information Technology.

The Rules:

  1. I am not eligible.
  2. You’ve made a significant positive impact on healthcare workflow using information technology during the previous year…
  3. Or, you’ve published, in some online form, promising ideas or persuasive opinions about healthcare workflow. (This, because this whole healthcare workflow thing is so very nascent.)
  4. You have some presence on social media (basically, Twitter).
  5. Winners may publish the above POWHIT! social badge on websites as long as there is a link back to the Top Ten list.
  6. You don’t have to be an HIMSS15 exhibitor. (Though I’d love to drop by to “chat you up”, as my English accented wife puts it.)
  7. You don’t even have to be a HIMSS15 attendee. (Though I’d love to meet you face-to-face in Chicago.)
  8. The Rules is in no way affiliated with the book of the same name.
  9. I made the rules so I can break the rules.
  10. There is no rule number 10.
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Listen To My Interview About Workflow On IntrepidNOW and Plans For HIMSS15

Many thanks to Joe LaVelle (@Resultant) at IntrepidNow!

  • What is the definition of workflow from the workflow guru?
  • What is a workflow engine?
  • How do workflow engines work with EHRs?
  • How many EHRS really have significantly configurable workflow?
  • Our listeners are interested in the role of standards with workflow? How do things like HL/7 and IHE play with workflow?
  • What vendors are really good at workflow?
  • Last year at HIMSS, #BigData was the star of the show; Will #BigWorkflow be the star of HIMSS15? What does Chuck have planned for HIMSS15?
Posted in healthcare-BPM | Leave a comment

I Used To Design EHR Buttons: Here Are Some Of My Favorites

Pediatric practices usually look a bit different from other medical practices in that they often include childlike elements. Sometimes even their websites reflect this: featured crayon artwork, handwritten-like fonts, and exhuberent silly humor (I love the sound of children’s laughter that automatically plays when you visit www.cooperpediatrics.com).

encounterpro-pediatric-emr-buttons

Pediatric EMRs and pediatric EMR workflow systems are important visual elements of the patient-pediatrician encounter. Toys in the corner, cartoons on the wall, and a continuously playing “The Little Mermaid” DVD are all reassuring signs that this is a child-friendly environment. Children see what we see and focus on what we focus on, and that includes EMRs. In other words, pediatric EMRs and pediatric EMR workflow systems unavoidably participate in this ecosystem of meaning.

But the following three were my favs of all time: Check out that last one with a martini and a cigar. Appropriate? Perhaps not. But when we offered to change it, well, it almost caused a mutiny.

button_virus Immunizations (OK, no child would likely recognize that this is a virus called a bacteriophage, but pediatrician users do seem to llike it)
button_stork Gravidity and Parity (Not sure about the educational implications of this one, but it’s still a favorite)
button_social_history Adult Social History (We did this button custom for a family medicine physician. Another user claims he bought the EHR *because* he liked this button. His first issue to support was “Give me my martini and cigar button back!”)
Posted in EHR Workflow | Leave a comment

Seven Posts About Wearable Workflow And Healthcare Unbound

(This is one of a series of blog posts addressing workflow and wearable themes at this year’s Healthcare Unbound conference. Head on over to Seven Posts About Wearable Workflow And Healthcare Unbound and read them in sequence! For introductions to healthcare workflow tech, see my five-part series or my 42-minute Youtube video.)

I usually write a series of blog posts I tweet during health IT-related conferences (most recently HFMA, HBMA, MGMA, AMIA, RSNA…). So I really perked my ears when I found out about an important theme at this year’s Healthcare Unbound, the future of healthcare wearable devices and services. I strongly believe that success or failure of wearable technology in healthcare depends on getting “wearable workflow” right!

Below is a list of topics, each with a short description or teaser. I came at wearables in healthcare from a healthcare work improvement perspective. However, as patients more-and-more become members of the care team, the same workflow tech that facilitates care coordination increasingly includes the patient. (See: Patient Experience And Engagement, Workflow And Workflow Tech.)

The next blog post in this series is Batteries, Workflow, & Stigma Are Biggest Barriers To Wearable Tech.


Links to all seven posts in this series:

Seven Posts About Wearable Workflow And Healthcare Unbound

This post.

Batteries, Workflow, & Stigma Are Biggest Barriers To Wearable Tech

Interestingly, all three involve different senses of the word, “power”

  • Batteries store and release power.
  • Power is the rate of performing work. It’s influenced by workflow.
  • Stigmatization involves power struggle.

But this observation is just a hook to get you read the post!

What’s The Connection Between Wearable Workflow Platforms and Health IT?

  • What’s an application platform?
  • How have application platforms evolved since the sixties?
  • What’s a wearable workflow platform?

Where In Healthcare Will Wearable Workflow Emerge First?

  • Consumer and patients wearing wearables: Not Google Glass.
  • Clinicians and healthcare workers: Google Glass
  • Hands free info and notifications, plus remote video sharing…

Who Are The Emerging Leaders in Wearable Workflow?

  • Apple
  • Google
  • Samsung
  • Salesforce
  • Intel
  • Vandrico
  • Blackberry
  • Jawbone

How Fast Will Wearable Workflow Become A Reality?

I average five different forecasts of the size of the wearables market in 2018. Then halve.

Google Glass Intel Inside®, The Internet Of Things, and The Maker Movement

This post is a little different. I’m a maker. I have Google Glass. I like Intel’s new Edison microprocessor. I describe my experience, motivations, and Internet of Things wish list.

(This was one of a series of blog posts addressing workflow and wearable themes at this year’s Healthcare Unbound conference. Head on over to Seven Posts About Wearable Workflow And Healthcare Unbound and read them in sequence! For introductions to healthcare workflow tech, see my five-part series or my 42-minute Youtube video.)

Posted in hcub2014, usability | Leave a comment

Batteries, Workflow, & Stigma Are The Biggest Barriers To Wearable Tech

(This is one of a series of blog posts addressing workflow and wearable themes at this year’s Healthcare Unbound conference. Head on over to Seven Posts About Wearable Workflow And Healthcare Unbound and read them in sequence! For introductions to healthcare workflow tech, see my five-part series or my 42-minute Youtube video.)

One of the questions Vince Kuraitis asked me was, “What are the top 3 barriers to market adoption [of wearable devices and services in healthcare]?”

The most important barriers that came easily and immediately to mind are tiny batteries don’t last long enough, getting personal and professional wearable workflow right is difficult, and the “stigma” of wearing gadgetry, especially on the face.

Wearable “Stigma”

I’ll start with stigma. I had a good friend in medical school who was also getting a PhD in Anthropology. He was studying stigmatized populations. Stigma is a set of negative and often unfair beliefs that a society or group of people have about something, such as race, gender, sexual orientation, obesity, smoking, depression, and, yes, wearables.

The best single example of stigmatization in the wearable space is what happened over time to Google Glass. Setting aside, for the moment, whether Glass is, or is not, the Newton or Segway of wearables, it has become highly stigmatized among everyday gadget consumers. Remarkably, in spite of this stigma, Glass, and similar head-mounted displays continue to attract positive attention in healthcare, particularly for a wide variety of hands-free, remote-viewing, ambient notification-oriented tasks. For example, at the recent wearables in healthcare conference in Indianapolis, 19 of 20 presentations were about Glass. But also telling, at the conference reception, even though many owned Glass, no one wore Glass. (Except me.)

Battery Life

Compared to stigma, the wearable battery life issue is relatively prosaic, but no less an obstacle to widespread adoption in healthcare, particularly among patients. There are wide variety of ongoing institutional clinical trials, many of which maintain multiple sets of wearables, so users can swap a wearable depleted of energy for an wearable that has been charging, swapping and beginning to charge the just depleted wearable, in a wearable charging/user turn taking strategy.

As a result of this obstacle to wearable tech, there’s intense activity in three areas: better batteries, better chargers, and less power hungry microprocessors.

Insufficient and long enough lasting power for wearable devices is even more pernicious than inconvenience for patient, effectively reduce the sell-in-to-able market for wearables, is the a sort of “chilling effect” (by analogy to journalists) on developers. The need to constantly think about how to minimize power requirements limits imagination.

The usually cycle of software development is to assume lots of computer resources, come up with the more kick-ass idea you can, and then optimize. Early versions of Glass (the 1 Gig variety, not the 2 Gig, I have one of each) were particularly prone to heating up and shutting down, not just when shooting video in a consumer use case, but simply when compiling and deploying the Android programs necessary to deliver the apps for users to use.

Wearable Workflow

Finally, we get to my favorite topic: workflow. I’ve even create a character, sort of like Reddy Kilowatt, called Mr. “Wearable Workflow” (shown in the tweet at the beginning of this post). I’ll be talking about “wearable workflow” for the reminder of this blog post series. So, please read my next post What’s The Connection Between Wearable Workflow Platforms and Health IT? if its been published, or tune in a return if you happen on this post just after I published it but before I published the next.

P.S. By the way, you’ll notice that I didn’t address healthcare wearable security. Headlines are full of concerns for notoriously insecure Internet-Of-Things tech. However, as big a (surmountable) obstacle security is, battery life, wearable workflow, and wearable stigma are greater.


Links to all seven posts in this series:

Seven Posts About Wearable Workflow And Healthcare Unbound

This post.

Batteries, Workflow, & Stigma Are Biggest Barriers To Wearable Tech

Interestingly, all three involve different senses of the word, “power”

  • Batteries store and release power.
  • Power is the rate of performing work. It’s influenced by workflow.
  • Stigmatization involves power struggle.

But this observation is just a hook to get you read the post!

What’s The Connection Between Wearable Workflow Platforms and Health IT?

  • What’s an application platform?
  • How have application platforms evolved since the sixties?
  • What’s a wearable workflow platform?

Where In Healthcare Will Wearable Workflow Emerge First?

  • Consumer and patients wearing wearables: Not Google Glass.
  • Clinicians and healthcare workers: Google Glass
  • Hands free info and notifications, plus remote video sharing…

Who Are The Emerging Leaders in Wearable Workflow?

  • Apple
  • Google
  • Samsung
  • Salesforce
  • Intel
  • Vandrico
  • Blackberry
  • Jawbone

How Fast Will Wearable Workflow Become A Reality?

I average five different forecasts of the size of the wearables market in 2018. Then halve.

Google Glass Intel Inside®, The Internet Of Things, and The Maker Movement

This post is a little different. I’m a maker. I have Google Glass. I like Intel’s new Edison microprocessor. I describe my experience, motivations, and Internet of Things wish list.

(This was one of a series of blog posts addressing workflow and wearable themes at this year’s Healthcare Unbound conference. Head on over to Seven Posts About Wearable Workflow And Healthcare Unbound and read them in sequence! For introductions to healthcare workflow tech, see my five-part series or my 42-minute Youtube video.)

Posted in hcub2014 | Leave a comment

What’s The Connection Between Wearable Workflow Platforms and Health IT?

(This is one of a series of blog posts addressing workflow and wearable themes at this year’s Healthcare Unbound conference. Head on over to Seven Posts About Wearable Workflow And Healthcare Unbound and read them in sequence! For introductions to healthcare workflow tech, see my five-part series or my 42-minute Youtube video.)

In this case, the answer the question posed by the title of this post is literally about the “connection” between the gadgets we wear on bodies and the data stored in health IT systems. How do we get the right data to or from the right gadget on the right person at the right place and time to the right health IT system. And the answer to this question is: a wearable workflow platform.

I’m sure that “What is a platform?” will be adequate addressed at the Healthcare Unbound conference. But for this post to be self contained I’ll provide this short definition. A platform is an environment (operating system, hardware architecture, set of application programming interfaces) executing a piece of software. An environment does two things. It constrains software development, and it facilitates it. A science fiction fan, I sometimes think of platform as sort of like a holodeck program. Choosing a platform is like running a holodeck program. And once it the platform/holodeck executes, we’ve create a little mini-reality, with its own logic, which we must respect and leverage.

Software platforms have evolved greatly since the sixties. At one time the only platforms were the various hardware architectures. There were no database platforms and operating systems were rudimentary. So, many early software applications basically had to do so much themselves, without help from their environments. These early applications mixed data, user interface, business logic, and, notably for my purposes, workflow together.

The first major transition between software application architectures (made possible by complementary shifts in platform capability) was to take data out of the application and story it in a database. The next major transition moved responsibility for managing elements of the user interface (buttons, dialogue boxes, etc.) out of application into the operating systems. Now, there are lots of different “platforms” out there, natural language platforms, cloud platforms, mobile platforms, etc. But, at the highest level of abstraction we are now seeing the migration of responsibility for representing and managing workflow out of applications into someplace else. Increasingly these workflow platforms reside in the cloud. Increasingly these workflow platforms talk to wearable technology. This is the wearable workflow platform to which I refer.

Suppose you’ve got a laptop, tablet, smartphone, Glass, smartwatch, and smartring (several can vibrate to indicate high priority incoming notifications). Now, imagine all of them “going off” at once! By what means can this be prevented from happening, in a context aware, user customizable, usable user experience sort of way?

There are basically two choices: Orchestration versus choreography. Orchestration is like an orchestra, so there needs to be a conductor. In classic workflow management systems this conductor is a workflow engine. The workflow engine consults a representation of workflow, variously called a workflow or process definition, or sometimes a work plan, and tells everyone what to do. In the past, these models were drawn or constructed in graphical user interfaces. Increasingly these models are learned from actual user behavior.

In our multiple wearable gadget example, whichever device the workflow engine selects, based on a model of work, workflow, or “life flow”, is the device that delivers the notification. And then, if the notification is not acknowledged (perhaps because it’s battery died, or because the device has been temporarily removed), it may escalate.

On the other hand, choreography of wearable devices workflows might be more like dancers or jazz musicians consulting their own limited models of workflow to prevent six devices from buzzing all at once. You could think about this as being a sort of polite conversation, with shared rules of etiquette: “OK if I buzz?”, Might anyone else prefer to buzz instead of me?” “What’s your priority?” “Yes indeed that is higher than mine” “Please go ahead!” But let me know if you’re notification isn’t acknowledged, so I can give it a try!” “Thank you!” “Welcome!” “Think nothing of it!” “Until next time”, “Cheers!”, etc.

I think you can get from the above comparison of wearable workflow the basic idea. Here’s my occasionally tweeted “Mr. “Wearable Workflow” guy! A series of tasks, consuming attention, achieving personal and professional goals, facilitated by wearable technology (personified!). In my next blog posts in this series I’ll drill down into the kinds of process-aware technology we’ll need to be to bring Mr. “Wearable Workflow” to life!

The next post in this series is Where In Healthcare Will Wearable Workflow Emerge First?


Links to all seven posts in this series:

Seven Posts About Wearable Workflow And Healthcare Unbound

This post.

Batteries, Workflow, & Stigma Are Biggest Barriers To Wearable Tech

Interestingly, all three involve different senses of the word, “power”

  • Batteries store and release power.
  • Power is the rate of performing work. It’s influenced by workflow.
  • Stigmatization involves power struggle.

But this observation is just a hook to get you read the post!

What’s The Connection Between Wearable Workflow Platforms and Health IT?

  • What’s an application platform?
  • How have application platforms evolved since the sixties?
  • What’s a wearable workflow platform?

Where In Healthcare Will Wearable Workflow Emerge First?

  • Consumer and patients wearing wearables: Not Google Glass.
  • Clinicians and healthcare workers: Google Glass
  • Hands free info and notifications, plus remote video sharing…

Who Are The Emerging Leaders in Wearable Workflow?

  • Apple
  • Google
  • Samsung
  • Salesforce
  • Intel
  • Vandrico
  • Blackberry
  • Jawbone

How Fast Will Wearable Workflow Become A Reality?

I average five different forecasts of the size of the wearables market in 2018. Then halve.

Google Glass Intel Inside®, The Internet Of Things, and The Maker Movement

This post is a little different. I’m a maker. I have Google Glass. I like Intel’s new Edison microprocessor. I describe my experience, motivations, and Internet of Things wish list.

(This was one of a series of blog posts addressing workflow and wearable themes at this year’s Healthcare Unbound conference. Head on over to Seven Posts About Wearable Workflow And Healthcare Unbound and read them in sequence! For introductions to healthcare workflow tech, see my five-part series or my 42-minute Youtube video.)

Posted in hcub2014 | Leave a comment

Where In Healthcare Will Wearable Workflow Emerge First?

(This is one of a series of blog posts addressing workflow and wearable themes at this year’s Healthcare Unbound conference. Head on over to Seven Posts About Wearable Workflow And Healthcare Unbound and read them in sequence! For introductions to healthcare workflow tech, see my five-part series or my 42-minute Youtube video.)

OK, what Vince actuality asked me was, “What healthcare industry segments or niche markets do you see as particularly promising?” But I’m well known for turning every question about digital health into a question about healthcare workflow and workflow technology. Plus V did indicate he was particularly interested in my experience and view re Google Glass.

I should precede what I’m about to see with a short disclaimer. My answer is extremely influenced by the so-called “availability heuristic” (recency or salience of memory influencing frequency estimate). In spite rejection of Google Glass by the consumer market (see my second post in which I discuss stigma as a barrier to wearable adoption) Glass is still going gang-busters in healthcare, if anything, it’s picking up speed. I recently attended the [wearable conference in Indianapolis] and participated in building a prototype workflow tech-driven Glass app for hospital environmental services.

Plus, since we’re (or at least I’m) talking wearable workflow, not wearables per se, this imposes a lower constraint on the necessary sophistication and complexity of wearable tech and backend systems. And right now, the only almost-to-market wearable of sufficient functionality and real-life playing out prototypes and pilots if Glass.

There may be as many as a hundred Glass in healthcare pilots out there. At the recent wearable in tech conference in Indianapolis, 19 out of 20 presentations were about Glass. Whereas the previous week there’d been two major (not healthcare specific) wearable conferences in which Glass was a small minority of presentations.

Many of the early of Glass startups both inside and outside healthcare are pivoting to smartwatches, which are the most similar to Glass in ability to deliver notifications and accept gesture and voice commands. What’s happening is a generalization of the small form factor, notification, acknowledgement, querying functionality across wearable devices. Of course smartwatches can provide the kind of realtime handsfree video streaming and sharing capability of glass, but the two classes of device not only share a fundamental wearable use case (notifications) but Android Wear and Glass share many parts of the Android platform.

So if Glass and smartwatches are in the lead for delivering sophisticated wearable workflow, where in healthcare will they deliver sophisticated wearable workflow first? Where Google Glass will thrive is a good received wisdom view on this.

“At health systems like San Diego’s Palomar Health and Boston’s Brigham and Women’s and Beth Israel Deaconess and at innovative companies like Pristine, Augmedix, Accenture and Philips, Google Glass is being teased, tossed and turned around to create a platform that allows the healthcare provider to access needed information at the point of care, communicate with colleagues, even create a real-time medical record.”

More generally, the Glass excels at the following three general use cases:

  • Real-time, hands-free, cognitive support
  • Ambient awareness
  • Capture experience

For an extended description and analysis of my Google Glass early adopter experience, in light recent news about Intel supplying chips for the next version of Glass, see my Google Glass Intel Inside®, The Internet Of Things, and The Maker Movement.

That’s the last post in this series. The next post is Who Are The Emerging Leaders in Wearable Workflow?


Links to all seven posts in this series:

Seven Posts About Wearable Workflow And Healthcare Unbound

This post.

Batteries, Workflow, & Stigma Are Biggest Barriers To Wearable Tech

Interestingly, all three involve different senses of the word, “power”

  • Batteries store and release power.
  • Power is the rate of performing work. It’s influenced by workflow.
  • Stigmatization involves power struggle.

But this observation is just a hook to get you read the post!

What’s The Connection Between Wearable Workflow Platforms and Health IT?

  • What’s an application platform?
  • How have application platforms evolved since the sixties?
  • What’s a wearable workflow platform?

Where In Healthcare Will Wearable Workflow Emerge First?

  • Consumer and patients wearing wearables: Not Google Glass.
  • Clinicians and healthcare workers: Google Glass
  • Hands free info and notifications, plus remote video sharing…

Who Are The Emerging Leaders in Wearable Workflow?

  • Apple
  • Google
  • Samsung
  • Salesforce
  • Intel
  • Vandrico
  • Blackberry
  • Jawbone

How Fast Will Wearable Workflow Become A Reality?

I average five different forecasts of the size of the wearables market in 2018. Then halve.

Google Glass Intel Inside®, The Internet Of Things, and The Maker Movement

This post is a little different. I’m a maker. I have Google Glass. I like Intel’s new Edison microprocessor. I describe my experience, motivations, and Internet of Things wish list.

(This was one of a series of blog posts addressing workflow and wearable themes at this year’s Healthcare Unbound conference. Head on over to Seven Posts About Wearable Workflow And Healthcare Unbound and read them in sequence! For introductions to healthcare workflow tech, see my five-part series or my 42-minute Youtube video.)

Posted in hcub2014 | Leave a comment